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Gaylord & Nantais

Worker's Compensation Attorney

3 Cases When Worker’s Comp Covers Injuries During a Commute

People face the risk of accidents on their daily commute to work, but injuries caused during such accidents are not typically covered under worker’s compensation laws. However, there are certain exceptions when a worker who is injured while commuting to work can successfully file for a compensation claim.

Here are 3 situations when a worker is eligible to file a worker’s compensation claim for injuries sustained during commuting to work:


  1. When Injured Within the Company Premises
    A company’s premise does not end at its exit door. It includes the parking lot, sidewalk, grassy surfaces, and basically the entire area within the company’s property. This means if you are injured at one of these places of your work while entering or leaving the company’s premises, you are eligible for worker’s compensation. If you are unsure about the ownership of places by the company, you should consult a worker’s compensation attorney to extract the legal information of ownership.

  2. While Running Errands for the Employer
    If you get injured in an accident while running errands for your employer beyond your work hours, you are technically covered by the company’s insurance. An accident that occurs when an employee is performing a work-related duty anywhere is normally acceptable to get worker’s compensation.

  3. When Injured During a Business Trip
    Any injury that occurs to you when there is an accident on a business trip is considered eligible for worker’s compensation. Your company funds all your work-related expenses on a business trip, so any accident related injury on the trip is also covered by the company’s worker’s compensation insurance. If you are injured in any of these accidents during your commute, don’t lose hope. A worker’s compensation attorney will assist you in every possible way to get a worker’s compensation settlement.

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