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Gaylord & Nantais

Worker's Compensation Attorney

New Medical Research to Benefit Worker’s Compensation

Patients with spinal disc problems may be helped by a new scientific development from UC Berkeley. Researchers have found that cow tails can be used to grow human spinal disc replacement tissue, which could lead to new more effective spinal treatments. Here are some details about this study for you to consider and how it may affect worker's compensation cases.

Recent Research
When spongy tissue between the vertebrae is damaged, patients are diagnosed with herniated discs, which can be very painful, leading to numbness and weakness. Many times this condition is a result of workers lifting heavy or awkward objects, causing lower back pain. At the moment, conventional treatments for this back problem include physical therapy, prescription drugs and surgery.

The recent Berkeley experiment was based on simulating human tissue by growing cow tails in an algae-based gel. After the cells absorb nutrients, the gel becomes a platform for cells to thrive, growing the nucleus, which feeds the cell exterior. This new development may eventually provide an alternative to disc replacement.

Compensation Claim
Unfortunately, spinal disc work injuries can lead to such long-term medical care that insurance companies avoid covering them, making them among the hardest claims to get approved for worker’s compensation. Some of the problems involved with spinal disc injuries are, they are difficult to diagnose, prove and treat. It's even more difficult for people with preexisting spinal issues. Experimental treatment is usually not covered by worker’s compensation, but may still be a viable solution.

Gaylord & Nantais can help you file a claim and get compensated if you experience a work-related injury. The team of Ned Gaylord and Thomas Nantais is very experienced in worker’s compensation cases and guarantee they can answer your questions quickly about your situation and the benefits in which you may be entitled.

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